McDonald’s Aims For Fully Recycled Packaging By 2025

Intent on being part of the solution, fast food giant McDonald’s has vowed to use sustainable packaging in 100% of its stores by 2025.  Currently only 10% of the 37,000 McDonald’s locations worldwide use recycled packaging for their food products, but they plan get all items like bags, straws, wrappers and cups from recycled or renewable materials, up from half currently.

Francesca DeBiase, McDonald’s chief supply chain and sustainability officer, says that customers number one demand was to make packaging more environmentally friendly.  In the UK, McDonald’s has already done away with Styrofoam packaging and more than 1,000 restaurants now have recycle bins. Even so, the world’s biggest restaurant chain said some restaurants might struggle to recycle packaging by 2025 due to varying infrastructure, regulations and customer behavior around the world.

McDonald’s is already taking large steps to achieve their goals, aiming for all its paper and card packaging, such as burger boxes or paper bags, to come from recycled or certified sources where no deforestation occurs by 2020.  Hopefully more fast food chains will take a page out of McDonald’s environmentally friendly book and work to achieve similar goals.

mcd food

Advertisements

AmeriStar Announces 2018 Package Awards Competition

ameristar

The Institute of Packaging has just announced it will be accepting entries for the 2018 AmeriStar Awards! The AmeriStar Award is an honor bestowed upon the top packages of the year in many categories.  Enter and you could win recognition for changing the face of packaging! LIVE judging will occur at the end of April 2018, ensuring your packages are evaluated and analyzed objectively.  Winning packages will be on display at PACK EXPO, winner trophies will be given to show at your company, and your package will receive trade press recognition in both print and online, as well as on social media.

ENTRY DEADLINE: March 9, 2018
See website for Entry Fees and Rules 

The AmeriStar Package Awards Competition includes:

Best of Show Award
The Best of Show Award honors the package that surpasses all judging criteria and is unanimously selected by the judges to be outstanding in every category.

Sustainable Packaging Award
This award recognizes the package that judges score the highest when considering how packaging can be developed to reduce the impact on the environment. This includes efficient energy usage, recycling efforts, effective use of packaging materials, recover or eco-friendly raw materials.

Design Excellence Award
This award honors the package that exhibits a shining example in which structure and graphic design integrate to create a compelling package. Judges consider factors such as design benefits that could include enhanced product findability on the shelf, improved package functionality that entices consumers to think about a product or product category in a new way, improved product presentation in-store and others.

Packaging That Saves Food: Agriculture
Packaging systems/format used to contain and distribute fresh produce from farm to wholesale market and/or retail outlet. Entries must demonstrate how their packaging protects the fresh produce and reduces/prevents damage during transit and/or display while also extending shelf life and minimizing food waste. This may be achieved by reducing crushing, enhanced cushioning, enhanced ventilation and avoiding double handling.

Packaging That Saves Food: Food Service
Packaging systems/format used to contain and distribute food into foodservice establishments. Entries must demonstrate how their packaging contains, protects and distributes their food product from manufacturing location through to the foodservice establishment, while also extending shelf life and minimizing food waste. This may be achieved through bulk sizing, individual servings, opening and or dispensing features, re-sealable/re-closeable features and improved communication on-pack.

See more AmeriStar categories on their website 

The Packaging Trends You Can Expect To See In 2018

There are five major packaging trends you can expect to see as we move into the new year, according to Mintel, a major market research firm. You can expect to see more minimalistic designs, packages that keeps marine conservation in mind, reinvigorated packaging for e-commerce, and more!

According to David Luttenberger, Global Packaging Director at Mintel, “Our packaging trends for 2018 reflect the most current and forward-looking consumer attitudes, actions, and purchasing behaviors in both global and local markets. Such trends as those we see emerging in e-commerce packaging have stories that are just now being written. Others, such as the attack on plastics, are well into their first few chapters, but with no clear ending in sight. It is those backstories and future-forward implications that position Mintel’s 2018 Packaging Trends as essential to retailer, brand, and package converter strategies during the coming year and beyond.”  Below is a list of the major trends you can expect to see as we move into 2018.

Packaged Planet:  Consumers often feel packaging is unnecessary or simply creates more waste.  Brands are starting to educate their consumers that packaging can actually extend shelf life of food and provide efficient and safe access to essential products in developed and underserved regions of the world! There is now a focus on innovative packaging that extends the freshness of food, preserves ingredient fortification, and ensure safe delivery.

rEpackage: Consumers from around the world shop online for convenience.  As more shoppers embrace online sales you will see brands developing their packaging to enhance the experience of shopping from home.  This new trend will help to reflect the expectations their consumers have when it comes to how their goods arrive at their destinations.

Clean Label 2.0: No more lengthy descriptions! Today’s consumers are more informed than ever, but brands risk losing customers who they bog down with too much information.  The “essentialist” design principle bridges the divide between not enough and just enough of what’s essential for consumers to make an enlightened and confident purchasing decision without second guessing the company’s authenticity.

Sea Change: Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the dangers associated with plastic packaging ending up in our oceans.  Concerns over safe packaging disposal will increase shopper’s perceptions of different packaging types and impact their purchasing decisions.  Consumers want to see brands working to create a circular economy to keep packaging materials in use. Only by communicating that a brand is working toward a reusable solution will consumers feel more confident in their purchases.

rEnavigate: Younger consumers are buying less processed and frozen foods.  They are instead opting for items purchased in the fresh or chilled aisles.  Brands are looking to reinvigorate their packaging to draw these consumers back into the center-of-store aisles.  The designs they’re using are now more contemporary, transparent, and recyclable.  They’re also opting for more uniquely shaped packages to draw the younger shoppers to check them out.

Following these five trends in 2018 will ensure your brand will be able to keep up with the growing needs of your consumers.

– – – – –

Follow us!

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GTSPackagingSolutions/

• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gtspackaging/

• Twitter: https://twitter.com/GTS_Packaging

• WordPress: https://gtspblog.wordpress.com/

• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/gts-packaging-solutions

Study Spotlight: “Where you say it matters: Why packages are a more believable source of product claims than advertisements”

A study by researchers at Florida State University and the University of Miami claim to have found a way to potentially make marketing claims seem more reliable. According to their paper published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, customers are more likely to perceive marketing claims as truthful when they’re made on the product’s packaging (as compared to in advertisements). Believability, they claim, increases with proximity to the product itself–since the packaging is by default closer to the product than an advertisement about it, it can ultimately be more effective in pushing sales.

The Florida researchers noted some key differences between packaging and advertisements that could potentially explain why a consumer would view a statement on a package as being more reliable. Most notably, in the United States food industry, health claims made on packaging are regulated with more vigor as compared to claims made in ads. Previous research speculates that “if consumers perceive this difference, then they may perceive food health claims made on packages as more credible than those featured in ads.” Partly because of this, the Florida study goes on to suggest that “consumers may believe that packages are meant to communicate objective information, such as usage instructions, whereas ads are meant to persuade consumers to select a specific brand.”

kickers energy spray

To test their theory, the researchers completed a series of three related studies. In Study 1, the researchers exclusively evaluated claim-to-product proximity, positing that the closer a marketing claim was to the physical product, the more likely the consumer would be to buy it. Presenting a claim made on an ad right next to the packaging itself should make the ad’s credibility identical to that of the packaging claim. At the beginning of the study, participants were given $1, and told it was in appreciation of their time. After completing an hour-long series of unrelated tasks, their were unknowingly subjected to the real study: each subject was told on their way out by a research assistant that a product (“Kickers Energy Spray”) from a previous experiment was on sale for $1. They were then asked if they’d like to purchase the spray while being shown one of six different product displays:

12

In order from top to bottom (and left to right):

    • An advertisement promoting the product
    • A different advertisement, also promoting the product
    • The product’s packaging
    • One of the advertisements accompanied by the product (without the package)
    • The other advertisement accompanied by the product (without the package)
    • The packaging accompanied by the product (without the package)

In line with the researchers’ predictions, participants who saw only the package were significantly more likely to purchase the product than those who saw only the ad (51% vs 10%). If the display included the actual product (regardless of whether it was accompanied by the ad or the package), the likelihood of purchase was equal, since the product itself was right next to the claim. The difference between the effectiveness of an advertisement with and without the product nearby was substantial–subjects were much more likely to purchase the product in the ad setting if the product was actually present. Overall, consumers were more inclined to buy the product when they saw the package, rather than the ad, and most inclined when the product itself was present.

What we can take out of this study is that, while companies can’t just go around putting any message they’d like on a product (the FDA would likely take issue with that), it may be time to reconsider striking some of the “wordy bits” off of packaging for the sake of a cleaner design. While good design is crucial for sales in pretty much any given scenario, striking a balance between artwork and on-package marketing may help to drive sales. It’s important to note that a campaign’s success is about more than just information–assume the consumer is able to glean at least the necessary information about a product from just a glance. After filling them in on anything else that may not be immediately obvious, the customer is left with a choice: to buy, or not to buy. This is where marketing comes in, because the goal from here on out is to ensure purchase. While advertising skepticism has been gradually increasing over time, an honest, unbiased, and informative call to action can push an unsure consumer to purchase. According to various studies, consumers tend to view unambiguous information, third party statements, and product comparisons favorably. Conversely, claims that seem in any way biased or misleading will drive sales in the opposite direction, so it’s important to be careful with wording.

The researchers went on to do two other studies further exploring claim-to-product proximity. Read the full paper, Where you say it matters: Why packages are a more believable source of product claims than advertisements, in the Journal of Consumer Psychology.

– – – – –

Follow us!

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GTSPackagingSolutions/

• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gtspackaging/

• Twitter: https://twitter.com/GTS_Packaging

• WordPress: https://gtspblog.wordpress.com/

• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/gts-packaging-solutions

DuPont’s 2016 Awards for Packaging Innovation

For 28 years running, DuPont has rewarded excellence in the packaging industry with their annual Awards for Packaging Innovation. One of the world’s leading science and engineering companies, Dupont is responsible for the invention of nylon, Tyvek, and Kevlar, amongst others. Dedicated to tackling global challenges, the Packaging Innovation Awards specifically champion achievements across three categories: Responsible Packaging, Enhanced User Experience, and Technological Advancement.

PIP_2016_Pharmaceutical_Packaging_Full

Up first as one recipient of DuPont’s Silver Award is Palladio Group’s PhutureMed™, in the Enhanced User Experience category. Chosen for ‘advancing patient safety,’ PhutureMed™ is “designed to monitor the quality of medicines shipped to patients and improve medication adherence of patients to prescribed drug therapies.” Every time the package is accessed, an entry is added to the time log. The log serves as a reminder for whether or not the patient has taken their medication (and also discourages tampering). This information can be vital for doctors, allowing doctors to monitor their patient’s care more accurately. Also built in is a temperature monitor, which will alert the user if the medication has ever gone above or below a designated range–it even works without battery power!

PIP_2016_Sunscreen_Applicator_Full

One winner in the Gold Award category for both Technological Advancement and Enhanced User Experience was PHD Skincare’s Never Miss a Spot Technology, an ‘extended wand sunscreen applicator.’ The wand allows for easy spraying of hard to reach areas, while maintaining a uniform mist at any angle–this enables users to get even coverage without assistance. The sprayer could also easily be adapted to other products, such as fertilizers and insecticides.

PIP_2016_Blow_Molded_PET_Container_Full

Receiving the highest honor as the sole recipient of the Diamond Award was Graham Packaging’s ThermaSet® Blow Molded PET Container. It excels across all three categories: Responsible Packaging, Enhanced User Experience, and Technological Advancement. Various design manipulations allow for far better than average thermal stability and increased wall strength. The container is also lightweight and shatter resistant, 100% recyclable, and produces a lower than average carbon footprint during manufacturing. The narrow, taller build also cuts down on valuable shelf storage in retail displays.

More information on all finalists and winners can be found here.

– – – – –

Follow us!

Pantone Color of the Year 2016

The following post was written by GTS Packaging Solutions’ Liz Wolfe, and is featured at gtspblog.wordpress.com.

Pantone_Color_of_the_Year_Rose_Quartz_Serenity_Color_Formulas_Guides_Banner

Pantone has just announced their 2016 Color of the Year, and for the first time since they started the practice in 2000, they’ve picked two colors: Rose Quartz and Serenity.

Last year, we noted that their 2015 choice ‘Marsala’ was an interesting one (pictured below on the left along with the colors from 2011-2014). Marsala’s deep, earthy tones are quite different from previous selections (which have all been rather lively).

past colors

It seems that Pantone is sticking with last year’s idea of shaking things up–while they are going back to their more colorful roots, Rose Quartz and Serenity are the first pastel colors they’ve selected since the early 2000’s.

Pantone’s Color of the Year isn’t just an arbitrary decision: in addition to being a huge name in the printing industry (thus inspiring next year’s trends), their selection is always inspired by current events. Rose Quartz and Serenity are meant to work together to soothe and balance viewers in a time of change and turbulence.

About their decision, they’ve said: “Joined together, Rose Quartz and Serenity demonstrate an inherent balance between a warmer embracing rose tone and the cooler tranquil blue, reflecting connection and wellness as well as a soothing sense of order and peace.”

Pantone also points out that “in many parts of the world we are experiencing a gender blur as it relates to fashion, which has in turn impacted color trends throughout all other areas of design. This more unilateral approach to color is coinciding with societal movements toward gender equality and fluidity, the consumer’s increased comfort with using color as a form of expression, a generation that has less concern about being typecast or judged and an open exchange of digital information that has opened our eyes to different approaches to color usage.”

– – – – –

Follow us!

Personalization: Why It’s Important for E-Commerce Packaging

It’s 2015, and retail e-commerce is doing better than ever. According to an estimate released by the U.S. Department of Commerce, in 2014, total retail sales amounted to well over 4.5 trillion dollars, and retail e-commerce sales accounted for nearly 3 billion of that (approximately 6.3% over all). Between 2005 and 2013, e-commerce sales figures as part of a larger whole have nearly tripled (rising from 2.4%). We’ve seen a steady incline in both general and e-commerce retail sales—that trend will likey continue, as experts predict that “60% of U.S. retail sales will involve the web by 2017” (through either direct purchase or research purposes). With numbers that high, why does our e-commerce packaging still look like this?

c99e3db826c0f4cc2688a36ce3b60e1a_XL

When a business has a storefront, it’s all about presentation. Workers are required to keep the site clean and operational at all times, and they must greet guests with a smile. Shelves are kept stocked and organized. Careful consideration is put into the look and feel of the store itself. Businesses understand that wowing their guests is good business. If what they are presented with is top of the line the whole way through, customers are more likely to come back.

Many business do bring their presentation beyond the storefront by spending thousands—or tens of thousands—of dollars on developing high class websites (web development is getting more affordable with the introduction of platforms that are designed to allow anyone to engineer their online presence, coding experience or not). Even if the customer is not physically present, steps can be taken to keep them coming back. A beautiful, easy to use site is a great start, but it doesn’t have to end there. Personalized e-commerce packaging is on the rise.

So why should a business bother doing this? If a customer is receiving a package, it’s clear they’ve already decided where they’d like to bring their business. Does it really matter how the package is presented? Technically, standard e-commerce packaging likely wouldn’t dissuade anyone from re-ordering from an online shop. They are used to seeing deliveries this way, after all. But fine tuning your presence from checkout to doorstep definitely won’t hurt.

Whenever I order something online, I’ll typically forget where it came from not long after,  unless it’s something branded. Even if custom packaging doesn’t work for you, the smallest acts can and will go a long way—for example, I’ve purchased several birthday presents from the artist Wednesday Wolf, who I haven’t forgotten about because he included a personalized message with my first order.

boxes feb2015-fg-00915dd798b6f126edbf1335f53669bc

For custom shipment packaging, look to a company like Loot Crate, “a monthly box of geek & gamer gear.” For a service like this, the unboxing is a big deal because the contents are a surprise. Having packaging like the above is a nice touch: pulling new loot out of a sleek, custom box is more exciting than ugly/standard shipping gear. I actually first found out about Loot Crate via Facebook when a friend posted a picture of his new crate, box and all. The packaging itself was clearly part of the excitement, and so it made it into the picture (while a normal box would have likely been discarded).

trunk-club-box Trunk-Club-Mens-Outfitters8

There’s also Trunk Club, a service that matches clients with online personal stylists. They’ll build you a custom wardrobe, keeping in mind your style and preferences, and then ship it straight to your doorstep. The clothing is laid out nicely in the box upon arrival, and the exterior of the box itself looks great. Trunk Club also capitalizes on the custom note business—each crate contains a handwritten message from designer to recipient. Many clients not only return for more, but opt to work with the same stylist time after time because of the high level of personalization they’ve achieved (after all, over the years, stylists start to get a really great understanding of what their clients like and don’t like).

Like I said. Shipping presentation probably won’t dissuade anyone from re-ordering. They may just forget about you in the grand scheme of things. In an economy that will see a higher and higher prevalence in online ordering, personalization is the key to getting customers to remember why they decided to order from you in the first place.


Don’t forget to Like us on Facebook!